Why Visualization Matters for Speakers

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A recent study by cognitive neuroscientists at the University of Oslo found that imagining a series of images produced the same physiological responses as actually looking at the images. That’s why visualization matters for speakers.  You need to imagine yourself succeeding.  In terms of your brain, it’s virtually the same thing as actually doing it.  [...]

Ian Cunliffe, Ed Tate, Kuala Lumpur, and the Art of Visualization

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Meet Ian Cunliffe.  His public speaking journey is an extraordinary one, from fearful to joyful, from never-going-to-speak-in-public to competing in world championships, from amateur to coaching others.  You can read about Ian in more detail here.  But for this post I’m going to focus on one particular aspect of Ian’s journey:  visualization.  Because it’s the [...]

Trust Matters for Speakers. Here’s Why.

Ten steps to improve presentations

There are a few times in life when we take a leap, a leap of faith, a leap of trust.  There are the obvious big ones like taking a new job, or getting married.  And then there’s the smaller, less obvious one of giving a speaker an hour of our time.  We’re trusting that speaker [...]

How to Ace a Job Interview

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In celebration of my first book, Give Your Speech, Change the World, now becoming available as an eBook, I’m excerpting a bit from the book on how to ace a job interview.  I’ve edited the text slightly to fit the blog, but I still like the advice.  Enjoy! How to Ace a Job Interview The [...]

How Do You Carry Yourself?

How to prepare a 20 minute TED talk

How do you walk into a room, out of a meeting, or onto a stage?  You probably have some parental or authority figure in your past who told you to worry about your posture, but how you carry yourself is more important and more subtle than just standing up straight when you go on a [...]

The World’s Second Most Famous Brain and What It Teaches Public Speakers

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In 1953, an epileptic had brain surgery to try to relieve the seizures he was experiencing that were making his life a nightmare.  A neurosurgeon, William Beecher Scoville, removed a piece of Henry Molaison’s brain about the size of an apple, and cured him of his seizures. Unfortunately, the operation also robbed H.M. (as he [...]

How to Listen to a Speech

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I post often about how to give a speech.  But most of us also find ourselves on the receiving end of speeches too, and listening to them is nearly as hard work as giving them.  So how do you listen critically and well to a speech to get the most out of it, and avoid [...]

How Can You Tell if Someone Is Lying?

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Recently, a psychologist decided to put an end to the misinformation around lying with some research, and the results both reinforced and undercut our common sense, traditional take on this important bit of human behavior. First of all, as I have been noting in this blog for some time, you have to let go of [...]

What to Do with Your Stage Fright

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A recent study from Harvard Business School of 400 participants found that if you tell yourself to get excited when about to do something stressful, like give a speech, you do better than when you try to calm yourself down. At least, that’s the way the study was discussed in the press – as a [...]

How’s Your Imagination as a Public Speaker?

Imagery in Sport

Anyone who is seriously interested in peak performance issues in high-adrenaline endeavors like public speaking, sports competition, or leadership, needs to understand the work that has been going on for years in sports psychology to improve performance via imagery.  Most of us, as we strive to get better at a high-adrenaline craft, will sooner or [...]