5 Ways to Avoid Looking Like an Idiot as a Public Speaker

I let the doctor talk me into a flu shot during my annual physical this week, and I’ve had a bit of a reaction to it.  I bled, my arm swelled up, and now I’ve got the mini-flu.  So, needing a laugh, I am thankful to friend and great speaker Micah Solomon, guru of customer service in the digital era, for sending me a link to the Onion TED-talk spoof.  It’s fun,… Read More

3 Quick Tips for Impact in Your Next Presentation

For my blog today, I'm linking to a short article I did for CIO magazine on 3 quick ideas for greater impact in your presentations.  Enjoy!

The 10 Commandments of Presentations

A few years back I did a version of these.  Today, I was inspired to update them.    I.  Thou shall speak authentically, from the heart.   II.  Thou shall focus on the audience.   III. Thou shall not use Power Point as speaker notes.   IV.  Thou shall not begin thy speech with a joke*.    V.  Thou shall speak with all appropriate passion, and not be boring.   VI.  Thou… Read More

5 Stupid Speaker Tricks

Speakers do stupid things, like any other group of people.  The problem is that they subject whole audiences to boredom and, yes, pain as a result.  So it’s not only the speakers themselves who suffer.  In an effort to mitigate the suffering, here are 5 of the most egregious stupid speaker moves.  If you know someone who perpetrates these, tell them!  Stop them!  You’ll be doing the windowless meeting room world a… Read More

#4: 5 Blogs. 5 Days. 5 Quick Takes for Improving Your Speaking in 2012.

What are the 5 most important quick ideas for improving your public speaking?  I’m going to go for broke this week and blog on 5 quick takes in 5 days.  Put them together and you should have a good ‘cheat sheet’ for fulfilling your resolution to improve your public speaking in 2012.  4.  In delivery, don’t fall into the Power Point Triangle of Death.  I have seen so many speakers, even confident,… Read More

#3: 5 Blogs. 5 Days. 5 Quick Takes for Improving Your Speaking in 2012

What are the 5 most important quick ideas for improving your public speaking?  I’m going to go for broke this week and blog on 5 quick takes in 5 days.  Put them together and you should have a good ‘cheat sheet’ for fulfilling your resolution to improve your public speaking in 2012.  3.  Don’t start with Power Point.   Most people create a presentation by sifting through the collection of slides they’ve accumulated… Read More

Power Point’s dirty little secret

I’ve blogged often about the abuse of Power Point and other slide software programs – using them as speaker notes, and making them more about words than images.  And of course, the over-use and over-dependence on software instead of just connecting with your audience, person to person. But there’s a further problem with the software, one that’s even more insidious and destructive to good presentations.  Because slides are created one at a… Read More

10 Things to Do Instead of Power Point

The bad news:  there are thousands of presentations every day, everywhere around the world.  Most of them use Power Point, badly, as speaker notes, with more words or numbers on each slide than anyone can read.  The results are predictably boring – no, excruciating  — for their hapless audiences.  That’s human misery on a massive scale.  The good news:  in an effort to make the world a better place, here are 10… Read More

If You Must Use Power Point, Here’s How To Do It – 5 Tips From Hans Rosling

One of the modern masters of data – and specifically data presented to an audience on a slide – is Hans Rosling.  He’s spoken regularly at TED and TEDx talks about big issues like child mortality, and his talks are mesmerizing.  He’s an example of a speaker that presents data in ways that prove his point, never become confusing or boring, and draw the audience in.  Check out one of his recent… Read More

Power Point and the Triangle of Death – A Rant

The origins of Power Point were solidly grounded in good intentions.  Remember slides?  People put pictures on them, or graphs — visual aids.  They were intended to act as accompaniments to lectures and presentations.  The whole idea was that the speaker would talk for a while, and then occasionally show a slide that illustrated a point with a picture or a striking image, or made a set of numbers clear with a… Read More