The Difference Between Liberal and Conservative Audiences

Most countries have a political spectrum that divides along conservative v liberal lines. In the US, it’s the Republicans v the Democrats; in the UK, it’s the Tories v the Laborites; in Game of Thrones, it’s King’s Landing v Winterfell, and so on. Now, some recent research helps us understand what underlies the differences between […]

Which Is Better – PowerPoint or a FlipChart?

Regular readers of this blog will know that I’m not a fan of PowerPoint (or any other slide software) – specifically the use of long bulleted lists as de facto speaker notes more for the benefit of the speaker than her audience. Those who have seen me speak will know that I am a big […]

Rookie Storytelling Mistakes

I blog often – and the world is in enthusiastic agreement – about the need to tell stories to get attention and be remembered. And I often talk about the five fundamental stories: the Quest that Hollywood knows so well, and the four others that are just as fundamental to our thinking: Stranger in a […]

Should a Speaker Tell Stories about her Speaking in her Speeches?

Movies about movies rarely succeed, just as theatre about theatre usually falls flat. Industry insiders love them, and so they keep getting performed and filmed, but the general public doesn’t embrace them as a rule. Noises Off, which is my personal choice for the funniest movie of all time, a movie about a play about […]

Don’t Let Your Audiences Be Passive!

People don’t like to be passive.  They don’t like to sit still and do nothing.  They’d even rather shock themselves repeatedly than just sit and think, according to a study recently published in Science. The study received a fair amount of press attention, possibly because it harkened back to the infamous Milgram study from many […]